Categories
World News

18 Five-Ingredient Thanksgiving Recipes

You don’t have to plan and cook for days to have a memorable Thanksgiving meal. These simple recipes call for just five ingredients or fewer (not including salt and pepper), so you can get dinner on the table and get to the best part: eating.

1. Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

A scattering of pomegranate seeds makes this brussels sprouts dish from Colu Henry look fancy. But it’s really just a matter of roasting the sprouts with a little olive oil, salt and pepper, then tossing with chopped walnuts and the ruby seeds.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

2. Buttermilk-Brined Turkey Breast

Samin Nosrat’s buttermilk-brined roast chicken has long been one of NYT Cooking’s most popular recipes. It stands to reason then that the same technique applied to a whole turkey and turkey breast would yield extraordinary results.

Recipes: Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey Breast and Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey

3. Potatoes Au Gratin

The key to Mark Bittman’s potatoes au gratin is to season as you go so that each slice of potato has flavor. (Potatoes suck up a lot of salt.) If you’re looking to up your game, add fresh thyme or chopped rosemary to the half-and-half before pouring it over the potatoes.

Recipe: Potatoes au Gratin

4. Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

Instead of taking up valuable stovetop real estate, let your slow cooker do the work. This complex cranberry sauce from Sarah DiGregorio uses a combination of cooked cranberries and crisp, fresh cranberries. Leave out the port if it’s not your thing, and don’t worry if you don’t have a slow cooker; there’s a stovetop method, too.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

5. Candied Sweet Potatoes

This glossy four-ingredient dish, which Melissa Clark adapted from “The Harvey House Cookbook,” calls for just sweet potatoes, butter, confectioners’ sugar and salt. It’s best served warm, not blazing hot, so it’s ideal for Thanksgiving, when sides have to wait around patiently for the turkey to finish.

Recipe: Candied Sweet Potatoes

6. Key Lime Pie

OK, so it’s not traditional pumpkin pie, but this cold and tangy dessert by Joyce LaFray Young will cheer up your taste buds after all of that rich Thanksgiving fare.

Recipe: Key Lime Pie

7. Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

Lidey Heuck adds lemon zest and crisped pancetta to roasted green beans for a simple, yet special side dish. This recipe serves 8 to 10, but it easily halves for a smaller group.

Recipe: Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

8. Make-Ahead Gravy

Save yourself the stress of making gravy under the watchful eyes of hungry diners by making it in advance. Mark Bittman’s version is one of our most popular Thanksgiving recipes because you can make it up to five days early. When you’re ready to eat, reheat and stir in some turkey drippings.

Recipe: Make-Ahead Gravy

9. Creamed Corn

This sunshine-y side from Amanda Hesser can be made with fresh or frozen corn. If using frozen, add a little water when cooking before you add the milk. If you want it creamier, whiz some of the cooked corn in a blender and stir it back into the pot.

Recipe: Creamed Corn

10. Vanilla Crème Brûlée

End the meal with something special and luxurious like this crème brûlée from Mark Bittman. You don’t need a blowtorch; your oven’s broiler will do. One important note: Chill the custard for several hours before browning the top, otherwise you’ll end up with custard soup.

Recipe: Vanilla Crème Brûlée

11. Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

Don’t bother peeling the butternut squash. Ali Slagle cuts it in half-inch slices before roasting, then finishes it with a tangy, spicy brown-butter vinaigrette and fresh mint.

Recipe: Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

12. Bittersweet Chocolate Mousse With Fleur de Sel

Here’s a fun magic trick of a dessert that Melissa Clark adapted from the molecular gastronomist Hervé This: Melt good bittersweet chocolate, place it in an ice bath, then whip it by hand for 3 to 5 minutes (you’ll want help) until thick and fluffy. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: 5-Ingredient Recipes

Highlights

Categories
World News

18 Five-Ingredient Thanksgiving Recipes

You don’t have to plan and cook for days to have a memorable Thanksgiving meal. These simple recipes call for just five ingredients or fewer (not including salt and pepper), so you can get dinner on the table and get to the best part: eating.

1. Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

A scattering of pomegranate seeds makes this brussels sprouts dish from Colu Henry look fancy. But it’s really just a matter of roasting the sprouts with a little olive oil, salt and pepper, then tossing with chopped walnuts and the ruby seeds.

Recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Walnuts and Pomegranate

2. Buttermilk-Brined Turkey Breast

Samin Nosrat’s buttermilk-brined roast chicken has long been one of NYT Cooking’s most popular recipes. It stands to reason then that the same technique applied to a whole turkey and turkey breast would yield extraordinary results.

Recipes: Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey Breast and Buttermilk-Brined Roast Turkey

3. Potatoes Au Gratin

The key to Mark Bittman’s potatoes au gratin is to season as you go so that each slice of potato has flavor. (Potatoes suck up a lot of salt.) If you’re looking to up your game, add fresh thyme or chopped rosemary to the half-and-half before pouring it over the potatoes.

Recipe: Potatoes au Gratin

4. Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

Instead of taking up valuable stovetop real estate, let your slow cooker do the work. This complex cranberry sauce from Sarah DiGregorio uses a combination of cooked cranberries and crisp, fresh cranberries. Leave out the port if it’s not your thing, and don’t worry if you don’t have a slow cooker; there’s a stovetop method, too.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Cranberry Sauce With Port and Orange

5. Candied Sweet Potatoes

This glossy four-ingredient dish, which Melissa Clark adapted from “The Harvey House Cookbook,” calls for just sweet potatoes, butter, confectioners’ sugar and salt. It’s best served warm, not blazing hot, so it’s ideal for Thanksgiving, when sides have to wait around patiently for the turkey to finish.

Recipe: Candied Sweet Potatoes

6. Key Lime Pie

OK, so it’s not traditional pumpkin pie, but this cold and tangy dessert by Joyce LaFray Young will cheer up your taste buds after all of that rich Thanksgiving fare.

Recipe: Key Lime Pie

7. Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

Lidey Heuck adds lemon zest and crisped pancetta to roasted green beans for a simple, yet special side dish. This recipe serves 8 to 10, but it easily halves for a smaller group.

Recipe: Roasted Green Beans With Pancetta and Lemon Zest

8. Make-Ahead Gravy

Save yourself the stress of making gravy under the watchful eyes of hungry diners by making it in advance. Mark Bittman’s version is one of our most popular Thanksgiving recipes because you can make it up to five days early. When you’re ready to eat, reheat and stir in some turkey drippings.

Recipe: Make-Ahead Gravy

9. Creamed Corn

This sunshine-y side from Amanda Hesser can be made with fresh or frozen corn. If using frozen, add a little water when cooking before you add the milk. If you want it creamier, whiz some of the cooked corn in a blender and stir it back into the pot.

Recipe: Creamed Corn

10. Vanilla Crème Brûlée

End the meal with something special and luxurious like this crème brûlée from Mark Bittman. You don’t need a blowtorch; your oven’s broiler will do. One important note: Chill the custard for several hours before browning the top, otherwise you’ll end up with custard soup.

Recipe: Vanilla Crème Brûlée

11. Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

Don’t bother peeling the butternut squash. Ali Slagle cuts it in half-inch slices before roasting, then finishes it with a tangy, spicy brown-butter vinaigrette and fresh mint.

Recipe: Roasted Butternut Squash With Brown Butter Vinaigrette

12. Bittersweet Chocolate Mousse With Fleur de Sel

Here’s a fun magic trick of a dessert that Melissa Clark adapted from the molecular gastronomist Hervé This: Melt good bittersweet chocolate, place it in an ice bath, then whip it by hand for 3 to 5 minutes (you’ll want help) until thick and fluffy. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: 5-Ingredient Recipes

Highlights

Categories
World News

This Thanksgiving, It’s Time to Stop Nap-Shaming

Like many Americans, the chef Nicole Pederson enjoys stretching out on the couch after the turkey and stuffing have been cleared, closing her eyes and losing consciousness for a short time. But 2012 was when she proved she was no ordinary Thanksgiving napper.

She had opened a new restaurant that fall in Evanston, Ill. By Thanksgiving Day, when she showed up at the house of a friend who was going to cook an elaborate, multicourse Caribbean-inspired menu, the long hours had caught up with her.

She took her first nap of the day before noon, shortly after downing a glass of Champagne. She returned to the couch after the appetizer, a squash-and-cheese empanada, and was awakened in time to eat the hearts-of-palm salad. From that point on, she said, “I think I slept between every course.”

Ms. Pederson has never equaled the daring structure and heroic commitment of her serialized nap of 2012, but her friends nevertheless expect her to make at least some effort each November. “They feel like it wasn’t Thanksgiving if they haven’t seen me pass out on the couch somewhere,” she said.

As Ms. Pederson’s friends understand, a great Thanksgiving Day nap can be an inspiration. For some reason, though, journalism on the subject tends to be written as if curling up on the nearest piece of upholstery were a criminal activity.

Some newspaper and magazine accounts of Thanksgiving naps use language more typically found in court reporting and police-blotter items. A 2014 article in The Washington Post noted that while some people had attempted to “blame the turkey” for the grogginess we feel after Thanksgiving dinner, the sides and desserts had been revealed as “the real culprits.” Men’s Journal concurred, reporting that “the bird may not be guilty after all.”

Other writers borrow from medical literature, identifying the relaxed condition caused by drumsticks and gravy as a “food coma.” In this metaphor, the fault is not the meal’s. It is ours, for eating so greedily that we succumb to a self-inflicted, though temporary, brain injury.

One may well wonder how a quick swoon on the sofa became so fraught. We find it adorable that cats, dogs and babies take a short afternoon snooze, but when adults do it one day a year, something must be wrong.

Instead of asking how to prevent naps, why aren’t there more articles giving advice on the best ways to induce one? After all, a napping Thanksgiving guest is a guest who isn’t insulting a family member’s romantic choices, or spouting political beliefs so retrograde they would have shocked George Wallace, or doing any number of other things people don’t do when they’re unconscious.

The subtle shaming of Thanksgiving nappers comes as no surprise to sleep experts. Sara E. Alger, a sleep scientist at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Md., has been a public advocate for naps, particularly in the workplace, except in cases of insomnia. Along the way, she has had to fight anti-nap prejudice.

“Naps in general have a stigma attached to them as something you only do when you’re lazy or when you’re sick,” Dr. Alger said.

Wrapped inside nap phobia in the United States is often a message reminding us to be productive during what we now think of as normal working hours, although that concept is relatively new.

Modern attitudes about napping go back to the Industrial Revolution, according to Matthew J. Wolf-Meyer, an anthropologist at Binghamton University in New York and the author of “The Slumbering Masses: Sleep, Medicine, and Modern American Life.”

“For a long time, people had flexible sleep schedules,” Dr. Wolf-Meyer said. Farmers and tradespeople had some autonomy over their time. They could choose to rest in the hottest part of the day, and might take up simple tasks during a wakeful period in the middle of the night, between two distinct bouts of sleep.

As the 1800s went on, more and more Americans worked in factories on set shifts that were supervised by a foreman. “They work for a total stranger, and a nap becomes totally nonnegotiable,” he said.

Staying awake all day and getting one’s sleep in a single long stretch at night came to be seen as normal. With that came a strong societal expectation that we ought to use our daylight hours productively.

“Even on a holiday, we’re not exempt from those expectations about productivism,” Dr. Wolf-Meyer said. “Even on Thanksgiving. You’re supposed to be doing something, even if it’s watching TV. Our labor on holidays is to interact with our relatives. So the nap is kind of a problem.”

Whether we will have any relatives in the room to interact with this Thanksgiving is another question. Americans are being warned that if they make the trip over the river and through the woods to Grandmother’s house, Grandmother might not make it to Christmas.

To allow families to gather together even though they are gathering separately, Zoom will lift its 40-minute limit for free calls on Thanksgiving. This will allow people to schedule their naps around the video conference, a skill many of them began learning after work-from-home orders came down this spring.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

12 Thanksgiving Desserts Worth Saving Room For

1. Brandied Pumpkin Pie

A creamy pumpkin pie is a tried-and-true way to end the Thanksgiving meal. You can, of course, stick to tradition, with a classic take. Or … you could live a little. This Melissa Clark recipe benefits from the addition of brandy, and you can even use canned squash in place of the pumpkin.

Recipe: Brandied Pumpkin Pie

2. Skillet Caramel-Apple Crisp

Not everyone loves pie. And that’s OK. There are many ways to satisfy a sweet tooth. For those who like a bit of crunch with their tender apples, there’s this skillet caramel-apple crisp from Yossy Arefi. The recipe yields a good amount of caramel sauce — for sweetening the apples, for serving alongside and for devouring later.

Recipe: Skillet Caramel-Apple Crisp

3. Carrot Cake

Those who love cake at any occasion should try this carrot cake from Dorie Greenspan. It’s warmly spiced with cinnamon, packed with coconut, raisins and nuts and finished with a tangy cream cheese dressing.

Recipe: Carrot Cake

4. Bourbon Pecan Pie

For some, there is little finer in life than a slice of pecan pie. This version, from Julia Reed, is a classic: The alcohol evaporates, leaving behind a filling that’s equal parts tender and crunchy. “The goo,” one commenter wrote, “is excellent.”

Recipe: Bourbon Pecan Pie

5. Cranberry Curd Tart

A radiant beauty, David Tanis’s cranberry curd tart makes an elegant statement on the Thanksgiving table. Make it a few days in advance and wow your loved ones by breaking it out on the holiday.

Recipe: Cranberry Curd Tart

6. Sweet Potato Pie

Baking powder makes this version of the Southern classic from Amanda Hesser extra light and fluffy. Commenters recommend baking the potatoes instead of boiling them, and using cream in place of evaporated milk. You do you.

Recipe: Sweet Potato Pie

7. Pecan Pie Truffles

Falling somewhere between pecan pie, rum balls and a traditional truffle are these sweet little treats, which Tara Parker-Pope adapted from the food writer Hannah Kaminsky.

Recipe: Pecan Pie Truffles

8. Apple Pie

“I am not the biggest fan of apple pie … until now.” The commenters have spoken. Sam Sifton’s recipe, adapted from the pastry chef Kierin Baldwin, has thousands of five-star reviews.

Recipe: Apple Pie

9. Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars

You don’t need a water bath or a springform pan for this creamy dessert from Erin Jeanne McDowell. The recipe yields 15 bars, but leftovers keep in the refrigerator for up to five days. Make them in advance, or save them for a week of sweet snacking.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: Our Best Desserts

Highlights

Categories
World News

12 Thanksgiving Desserts Worth Saving Room For

1. Brandied Pumpkin Pie

A creamy pumpkin pie is a tried-and-true way to end the Thanksgiving meal. You can, of course, stick to tradition, with a classic take. Or … you could live a little. This Melissa Clark recipe benefits from the addition of brandy, and you can even use canned squash in place of the pumpkin.

Recipe: Brandied Pumpkin Pie

2. Skillet Caramel-Apple Crisp

Not everyone loves pie. And that’s OK. There are many ways to satisfy a sweet tooth. For those who like a bit of crunch with their tender apples, there’s this skillet caramel-apple crisp from Yossy Arefi. The recipe yields a good amount of caramel sauce — for sweetening the apples, for serving alongside and for devouring later.

Recipe: Skillet Caramel-Apple Crisp

3. Carrot Cake

Those who love cake at any occasion should try this carrot cake from Dorie Greenspan. It’s warmly spiced with cinnamon, packed with coconut, raisins and nuts and finished with a tangy cream cheese dressing.

Recipe: Carrot Cake

4. Bourbon Pecan Pie

For some, there is little finer in life than a slice of pecan pie. This version, from Julia Reed, is a classic: The alcohol evaporates, leaving behind a filling that’s equal parts tender and crunchy. “The goo,” one commenter wrote, “is excellent.”

Recipe: Bourbon Pecan Pie

5. Cranberry Curd Tart

A radiant beauty, David Tanis’s cranberry curd tart makes an elegant statement on the Thanksgiving table. Make it a few days in advance and wow your loved ones by breaking it out on the holiday.

Recipe: Cranberry Curd Tart

6. Sweet Potato Pie

Baking powder makes this version of the Southern classic from Amanda Hesser extra light and fluffy. Commenters recommend baking the potatoes instead of boiling them, and using cream in place of evaporated milk. You do you.

Recipe: Sweet Potato Pie

7. Pecan Pie Truffles

Falling somewhere between pecan pie, rum balls and a traditional truffle are these sweet little treats, which Tara Parker-Pope adapted from the food writer Hannah Kaminsky.

Recipe: Pecan Pie Truffles

8. Apple Pie

“I am not the biggest fan of apple pie … until now.” The commenters have spoken. Sam Sifton’s recipe, adapted from the pastry chef Kierin Baldwin, has thousands of five-star reviews.

Recipe: Apple Pie

9. Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars

You don’t need a water bath or a springform pan for this creamy dessert from Erin Jeanne McDowell. The recipe yields 15 bars, but leftovers keep in the refrigerator for up to five days. Make them in advance, or save them for a week of sweet snacking.

Thanksgiving ›

Turkey F.A.Q.

We have a full guide on buying and cooking Thanksgiving turkey, but here are answers to some of your most common questions:

    • What’s the easiest way to roast a turkey? You don’t need to brine, stuff, truss or baste a turkey to get delicious results. Try this simple recipe for starters.
    • How big of a turkey should I buy? Buy one pound per person, or a pound and a half per person if you’d like to make sure you have leftovers. If you’re ordering your turkey from a butcher or farmer, you’ll need to do so a few weeks in advance.
    • How do I thaw a frozen turkey? Allow one day for every four pounds of turkey. A 12-pound turkey, for example, will need three days to defrost. Thaw your turkey in the fridge and make sure to put it in a bowl or on a platter as it may drip.
    • How will I know when the turkey is cooked? Take its temperature. A digital thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh should read 165 degrees.
    • How do I carve the turkey? Watch this video for instructions.

    Source: Our Best Desserts

Highlights

Categories
World News

Millions stick to Thanksgiving travel plans despite warnings

About 1 million Americans a day packed airports and planes over the weekend even as coronavirus deaths surged across the U.S. and public health experts begged people to stay home and avoid big Thanksgiving gatherings.

And the crowds are only expected to grow. Next Sunday is likely to be the busiest day of the holiday period.

To be sure, the number of people flying for Thanksgiving is down by more than half from last year because of the rapidly worsening outbreak. However, the 3 million who went through U.S. airport checkpoints from Friday through Sunday marked the biggest crowds since mid-March, when the COVID-19 crisis took hold in the United States.

Many travelers are unwilling to miss out on seeing family and are convinced they can do it safely. Also, many colleges have ended their in-person classes, propelling students to return home.

Laurie Pearcy, director of administration for a Minneapolis law firm, is flying to New Orleans to attend her daughter’s bridal shower and have a small Thanksgiving dinner with her son.

“I don’t want to unknowingly make anyone sick. But I also don’t want to miss this special event for my only daughter,” she said.

Stephen Browning, a retired executive from Tucson, Arizona, will be flying to Seattle for Thanksgiving with his sister. The celebration usually has up to 30 people; this year only 10 are coming, and everyone was asked to get a coronavirus test. He doesn’t plan on removing his mask to eat or drink on the flight.

“This is my first flight since December 2019, so yes, I have concerns,” he said. “But I think most airlines are acting responsibly now and enforcing masks on all flights.”

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged Americans not to travel or spend the holiday with people outside their household.

New cases of the virus in the U.S. have rocketed to all-time highs, averaging more than 170,000 per day, and deaths have soared to over 1,500 a day, the highest level since the spring. The virus is blamed for more than a quarter-million deaths in the U.S. and over 12 million confirmed infections.

“There is so much community transmission all over the United States that the chances of you encountering somebody that has COVID-19 is actually very, very high, whether it’s on an airplane, at the airport or at a rest area,” said Dr. Syra Madad, an infectious-disease epidemiologist for New York City hospitals.

The nation’s top infectious-diseases expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, told CBS’ “Face the Nation” that people at airports “are going to get us into even more trouble than we’re in right now.”

The message may be sinking in for some.

Bookings in 2020 are down about 60% from where they were this time last year. Thanksgiving reservations were ticking upward in early October but fell back again as case numbers surged. Since airlines have made it easier to cancel tickets, there could be a rash of cancellations closer to the holiday, said John Elder, an adviser to airlines from Boston Consulting Group.

In 2019, a record 26 million passengers and crew passed through U.S. airport screening in the 11-day period around Thanksgiving. This year, the industry trade group Airlines for America isn’t even providing a forecast because things are so uncertain.

Because of tighter restrictions by many governments, air travel in other parts of the world has, in contrast, come to a near standstill. In Europe, traffic between countries was down by 83% in September from a year earlier, and that has only worsened since then because many countries imposed new limits.

Josh Holman and his family were planning to fly to Lake Tahoe and spend Thanksgiving with his brother, who lives in San Francisco, and his parents, who live in North Dakota. But they scrapped those plans.

“I see it as my civic duty not to spread this virus further,” said Holman, an assistant county prosecutor who lives outside Detroit.

Alejandro Zuniga and his fiancee, Megan Muhs, who live in Costa Rica, thought briefly about flying to Wisconsin for Thanksgiving to see Muhs’ family but decided against it. They also nixed a trip to the U.S. in December.

“No part of a major international trip seems safe at this point,” Zuniga said. The pair plans to make video calls to family and stream the Detroit Lions football game on Thanksgiving Day.

More people tend to drive than fly over Thanksgiving, but even car travel is expected to see a drop-off, according to AAA. Based on surveys in mid-October, the association was expecting 47.8 million people to drive to Thanksgiving gatherings, down 4% from last year. But AAA said the drop could prove to be even bigger, given the worsening crisis.

Brad Carr and his wife, retirees who live in Griffin, Georgia, debated whether to drive 35 miles north to his son’s house for Thanksgiving and eat at a separate table on the porch. But after the CDC’s announcement, they decided to stay home. Carr’s son will deliver their meal “a la Uber Eats,” Carr said.

Those who do gather should eat outdoors, wear masks, stay 6 feet apart and have one person serve the food, the CDC said.

That’s the plan for Juliana Walter’s family. Walter, a student at the University of Tampa, plans to get a coronavirus test and then drive home to Maryland. Her parents have rented tents and outdoor heaters and will host up to 30 masked family members for Thanksgiving dinner.

The holidays close out a bleak year for U.S. travel. Travel spending is expected to drop 45% from 2019 levels, to $617 billion, according to the U.S. Travel Association, a trade group.

Canceling Thanksgiving trips is painful for many families.

Kelly Kleber usually flies from Seattle to her hometown of Tucson, Arizona, to spend the holiday with her parents. They have a picnic to celebrate the life of her sister, who died on Thanksgiving in 2015. This year, Kleber is sending her parents a portrait of her sister and plans a video call on Thanksgiving.

“It’s going to be hard being away from family this year,” she said.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

Highlights

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

Highlights

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

Highlights

Categories
World News

16 Thanksgiving Sides to Make You Forget About the Turkey

Let’s be honest: Turkey’s great, but Thanksgiving is about the sides. Some of us wait all year for stuffing, potatoes (sweet and regular), green beans and sprouts, mac and cheese — and even the cranberry sauce. To say nothing of rolls!

We’ve assembled some of our finest recipes, new and old, to round out your meal. These supporting players are so good, you’d be forgiven if you forgot about the turkey.

1. Creamy Double-Garlic Mashed Potatoes

For many families, a potato dish on the Thanksgiving table is nonnegotiable. You may have a beloved recipe, but if you don’t, may we recommend this one from Alexa Weibel? Roasted garlic gives it deep flavor, while crisp garlic chips provide a little bite.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

2. Green Beans With Ginger and Garlic

This recipe from Julia Moskin is a welcome spot of green amid the Thanksgiving starches. It comes together quickly, and its bright flavors and bold crunch are just the thing to counter all those potatoes and stuffings.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

3. Thanksgiving Dressing

For some, the hallmark of Thanksgiving is stuffing — or dressing, as it may be. (The difference? Stuffing is, well, stuffed inside the bird. Dressing sits alongside.) This version, from Sam Sifton, is the Norman Rockwell ideal: bread, celery, apples, onions, chestnuts, thyme and sage.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

4. Extra-Crispy Parmesan-Crusted Roasted Potatoes

J. Kenji López-Alt got his inspiration for these potatoes from Detroit-style pizza. They’re a little more involved than most roasted potatoes: There’s an initial boil, then a roast. But the end result is perfectly crispy.

View our collections of Mashed Potatoes Recipes and Roasted Potatoes Recipes, and our How to Make Potatoes guide, as well our Best Thanksgiving Side Dish recipes.

5. Cranberry-Pomegranate Relish

This is an especially pretty take on cranberry sauce: The pistachios add a lovely contrast to the bright red of the cranberry and pomegranate. And it’s also simple, ready in just 10 minutes. (Still, if you wait all year for the canned stuff, have at! It’s your Thanksgiving. Eat what you like.)

View our collections of Cranberry Sauce Recipes, Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

6. Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic

Brussels sprouts have a bad reputation, so often because they’re boiled past recognition. When roasted, they are something else entirely, crisp on the outside, tender on the inside with just enough char. With thousands of five-star ratings, Mark Bittman’s brussels sprouts with garlic couldn’t be any better — or easier.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

7. Sweet Potatoes With Miso-Ginger Sauce

This recipe, which Christine Muhlke adapted from the cookbook author Deborah Madison, pairs sweet potatoes with a versatile miso-ginger dressing. Take it from the comments section: “This sauce will taste great on ANYTHING!” Double it and use it on all kinds of things — soba noodles and rice, tofu and salads.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

8. Green Bean Casserole

A classic rendition here — creamy and cheesy, tender and crisp — is a must on many Thanksgiving tables. Millie Peartree’s recipe skips the canned soup but still satisfies, and lets you use just about any mushroom.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

9. Lemon-Garlic Kale Salad

Some — ahem, Sam Sifton — say salad has no place on the Thanksgiving table. For those who disagree, there’s this recipe from Julia Moskin, with its super-easy dressing of lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and salt. Sliced almonds add a nice crunch at the end.

View our collections of Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes and Vegetarian Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes.

10. Southern Macaroni and Cheese

Passed down through her family for generations, Millie Peartree’s can’t-miss, extra-cheesy mac and cheese skips the roux and starts with a milk and egg base for extra silkiness. As one commenter put it, “You won’t find a richer, crispier, creamier, cheesier mac & cheese recipe.”

Thanksgiving ›

Pie Baking Tips

There are few kitchen projects as rewarding as making this iconic American dessert. See our full guide on How to Make Pie Crust and a list of our best Thanksgiving pie recipes.

    • Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.
    • You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.
    • For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.
    • You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievably soggy.

    Source: Our Best Sides

Highlights